Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Heresy trials and English women writers, 1400-1670 / Genelle Gertz.

By: Gertz, Genelle.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : CUP, 2012Description: x, 258 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781107017054 (cloth).Subject(s): Trials (Heresy) -- Great Britain -- History | English literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | LITERARY CRITICISM / European / English, Irish, Scottish, WelshDDC classification: 820.9 Other classification: LIT004120 Online resources: Cover image | Contributor biographical information | Publisher description | Table of contents only
Contents:
Introduction : articulating women -- Belief papers and the literary genres of heresy trial -- Confessing Margery Kempe, 1413-1438 -- Recanting and rewriting Anne Askew, 1540-1546 -- Sanctifying ploughmens' daughters and butchers' wives : the interrogations of Alice Driver, Elizabeth Young, Agnes Prest and Margaret Clitherow, 1555-1586 -- Exporting inquisition : Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers at Malta, 1659-1663 -- Conclusion : visionaries, non-conformists and the history of women's trial writing.
Summary: "This book charts the emergence of women's writing from the procedures of heresy trials and recovers a tradition of women's trial narratives from the late Middle Ages to the seventeenth century. Analyzing the interrogations of Margery Kempe, Anne Askew, Marian Protestant women, Margaret Clitherow and Quakers Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers, the book examines the complex dynamics of women's writing, preaching and authorship under religious persecution and censorship. Archival sources illuminate not only the literary choices women made, showing how they wrote to justify their teaching even when their authority was questioned, but also their complex relationship with male interrogators. Women's speech was paradoxically encouraged and constrained, and male editors preserved their writing while shaping it to their own interests. This book challenges conventional distinctions between historical and literary forms while identifying a new tradition of women's writing across Catholic, Protestant and Sectarian communities and the medieval/early modern divide"--
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-251) and index.

Introduction : articulating women -- Belief papers and the literary genres of heresy trial -- Confessing Margery Kempe, 1413-1438 -- Recanting and rewriting Anne Askew, 1540-1546 -- Sanctifying ploughmens' daughters and butchers' wives : the interrogations of Alice Driver, Elizabeth Young, Agnes Prest and Margaret Clitherow, 1555-1586 -- Exporting inquisition : Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers at Malta, 1659-1663 -- Conclusion : visionaries, non-conformists and the history of women's trial writing.

"This book charts the emergence of women's writing from the procedures of heresy trials and recovers a tradition of women's trial narratives from the late Middle Ages to the seventeenth century. Analyzing the interrogations of Margery Kempe, Anne Askew, Marian Protestant women, Margaret Clitherow and Quakers Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers, the book examines the complex dynamics of women's writing, preaching and authorship under religious persecution and censorship. Archival sources illuminate not only the literary choices women made, showing how they wrote to justify their teaching even when their authority was questioned, but also their complex relationship with male interrogators. Women's speech was paradoxically encouraged and constrained, and male editors preserved their writing while shaping it to their own interests. This book challenges conventional distinctions between historical and literary forms while identifying a new tradition of women's writing across Catholic, Protestant and Sectarian communities and the medieval/early modern divide"--

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Last Updated on 27 November 2018
Copyright © Eastern University Library 2018